therapy

Working through grief

When it hits you just how much you’ve lost in life, it hits hard.

Many people who end up in therapy arrive there because their coping mechanisms have broken down. They  may have been super-efficient types masking a lifetime of pain, or people who were broken by a particular incident and stayed broken.

I tried very, very hard in the early months of psychotherapy to present the face I normally show the world. I held it together, as I did through work and through life for many years. I was unemotional and articulate, when all the time my therapist was observing how disconnected I was from my feelings.

It’s true. I switched my feelings off a long time ago. It wasn’t a conscious decision, but being numb and distanced became my protection.

The more stressed I became, the more rigid my protective structure felt. I started building it in childhood when I was being abused. It grew increasingly toughened during my teens, through rape and on through an unhappy relationship, the death of my father, the loss of two babies… and the eventual loss of my health.

I have to say at this point that life hasn’t been all bad. I have a beautiful son. I have friends I love, but I haven’t been seeing them lately. I’ve not felt up to it.

The final retreat came a few years ago when I was emerging from a not very happy relationship. This man was the love of my life, but I presented to him the same face I present everyone else, and he too had layers and layers of pain hidden away. We met at the wrong time.

When I found that I couldn’t get over him, I sought help. Now, having heard myself talk empty words over many sessions, I am starting to experience feelings.

I am wondering, several months into therapy, whether I am not only grieving for him… I am mourning all my losses.

 

 

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2 thoughts on “Working through grief”

  1. It’s so hard and it’s a life long process grieving any loss. I’ve had to teach myself to behold and celebrate my grief for my brother (I know how odd that sounds) but it means I love him so wholly and I’m grateful (too small a word) that he existed, that he was, always will be my brother and he loved me. I feel special. I wish you well on your journey. Keep writing, it helps. S

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for your lovely words. I feel swamped by grief, and I don’t think it will ever leave me. But maybe we should hold elements of it dear.
      I’m sure you must miss your brother terribly. I will take a look at your site. Thanks again.

      Liked by 1 person

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